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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
in conjunction with the king holiday called "martin's dream." internees his own journey with dr. king and the legacy -- one of the grid -- the legacy of one of the greatest men this nation has ever produced. a conversation with clayborne carson coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: on this day, when we honor the memory and legacy of dr. martin luther king jr., i am pleased to be joined by dr. clayborne carson, the director of the mlk research and education institute at stanford. he joins us tonight from colorado. always good to have you back on this program. >> great to be with you. tavis: at the king day to you. what do you make of the fact that, on this
the memory of dr. martin luther king jr. this weekend, we cap off the 10th anniversary week by revisiting our conversation with a civil rights icon in her own right, coretta scott king. back in 2005, we traveled to atlanta for a very special program with miss king at the famed ebenezer baptist church, the church that was home base for dr. king during much of the civil rights movement. a conversation which would turn out to be one of her last on national television. we're glad you could join us to wrap up this 10th anniversary week with a conversation with coretta scott king, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: as we kick off our second season in 2005, we could
that dr. king had that said there is right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> barack obama was a little- known state senator from an aillinois. the third african-american in the u.s. senate. i spoke to him after his great victory in illinois at a time when most people knew him as a skinny kid with a funny name from the south side of chicago. the phrase you have been accustomed to using, the skinny kid with a funny name from the south side of chicago. beyond that issue, how did you get beyond getting beyonpeople o vote for a guy whose name they could not renounce? >> they still screw it up sometimes. the call me alabama or yo mama. one thing that i confirmed in this race is the american people are decent people. they get confused sometimes. they're busy. there stressed. they are tired. sometimes they are watching fox news, that will ge
up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: when we launched the show in january 2004, one of our goals was to become a destination for the biggest names in music not only for a place to perform in a late night setting but a comfortable setting for conversation. we found it strange that on most late-night shows, musicians perform but seldom ever speak. if you weeks after we launched the show were paid a visit by one of the biggest artists on the planet, prince. this was his first time ever appearing on pbs. we decided to start the show differently before jumping into a terrific conversation. good evening from los angeles. tonight, prince on pbs. ♪ tavis: i am a fa
. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: it's no secret around here than i consider myself one of the biggest james taylor fans on the planet. i spent a couple of nice debating jamie lee curtis on which one of us is a bigger james taylor fan. he has just released a new album. sometimes it is a rocky road he has traveled during his remarkable career. winter, spring, summer, or fall, all you've got to do is call and i will be there, yes i will you've got a friend ♪ tavis: everybody knows how much i love james taylor. i say it unapologetically, i am the biggest james taylor fan in the entire world. i have stopped this guy all over the country. i stopped him in italy. i sit in the rain and he
that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> in october 2011 we were on our to be joined by leymah gbowee. she proved the difference of one single person can make in our world. she encourages the women of liberia to organize and fight for peace. that was the most important factor in the remarkable rise of backer's first female head of state. when she joined us back then to discuss her book, we had no idea that 48 hours after that conversation, she would go on to be awarded the nobel peace prize. let me start with this " on the back of the book. "she helped bring liberia out of the dark. her memoir is a captivating near to that will stand as testament to the power of women, face, and the spirit of our great co
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)